Tag: Pomona College Department of Art History

ARHI 184 Visits Hammer Museum to see exhibition of paintings of Canadian artist Lawren Harris

Art History classes at Pomona College often involve field trips to visit Los Angeles area museums.  On Sunday, January 24, 2016 Professor Frances Pohl took her Art History 184 class to see the Great Wall of Los Angeles mural by Judith Baca in North Hollywood and an exhibition of the landscape paintings of the Canadian artist Lawren Harris at the Hammer Museum in Westwood.

 

Students and Professors Pohl and Gorse at the Hammer Museum (with work of US artist Kenny Scharf)

Students and Professors Pohl and Gorse at the Hammer Museum (with work of US artist Kenny Scharf)

Exhibition of landscapes of Canadian artist Lawren Harris at the Hammer Museum

Exhibition of landscapes of Canadian artist Lawren Harris at the Hammer Museum

Lecture by Andrew Wald, “New Terminal Design: Making Futures for Japan’s Terminally-Shrinking Communities,” December 2, 4:15 pm, Hahn 108, Pomona College

Wald Lecture

HAVE AN APPETITE FOR ART HISTORY? INFORMATION LUNCH FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, LEBUS 110

Info lunch 11-13-15

Lecture by George Gorse: “‘Little Bridges’, Lebus Court, and Rembrandt Hall: A Centennial Celebration,” Monday, September 21, 4:15 pm, Lebus Court 113, followed by reception in honor of restoration of Burt Johnson’s “Spanish Music” (1916) and fountain in Lebus Court

Gorse lecture poster 2015

 

For video of lecture see Youtube video of Gorse lecture.

The Boy with the Flute is Back! Burt Johnson’s “Spanish Music” (1916) reinstalled in Lebus Court

 

Newly restored "Spanish Music" (1916) by Burt Johnson, in Lebus Court, 2015

Newly restored “Spanish Music” (1916) by Burt Johnson, in Lebus Court, 2015

Photograph of model of Burt Johnson's "Spanish Music," 1916 sent by artist to President Blaisdell

Photograph of model of Burt Johnson’s “Spanish Music,” 1916 sent by artist to President Blaisdell

On Friday, August 14, 2015 Burt Johnson’s 1916 sculpture “Spanish Music,” expertly restored by Donna Williams of Williams Conservation, was reinstalled on the rebuilt fountain in Lebus Court.  The sculpture was a gift to the college of the Class of 1915 and had remained in place in the courtyard until earlier this year, when a section of the fountain collapsed, leading to its rebuilding by McEachron Construction and Design based on photographs of the original fountain, and providing the opportunity to repair the statue’s broken flute and conduct an overall restoration.   There will be a reception in Lebus Court to celebrate the restored fountain and statue early in the fall semester, so keep an eye out for the announcement on this News page.

McEachron Construction and Design Team installing statue--Gabe Senica, Mike McEachron (kneeling) and Justin Kelly

McEachron Construction and Design Team installing statue–from left to right: Gabe Senica, Mike McEachron (kneeling) and Justin Kelly

Art History Alumna Dr. Amy Lyford (’86) wins Charles C. Eldredge Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in American Art for her book “Isamu Noguchi’s Modernism: Negotiating Race, Labor, and Nation, 1930-1950”

The Smithsonian American Art Museum has awarded the Charles C. Eldredge Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in American Art to Amy Lyford, professor of art history and associate dean of arts and humanities at Occidental College in Los Angeles, for her book Isamu Noguchi’s Modernism: Negotiating Race, Labor, and Nation, 1930–1950 (University of California Press, 2013). The text is a deeply researched examination of the early career of the Japanese American sculptor Isamu Noguchi. Lyford skillfully illuminates the artist’s practices and activism through richly detailed formal analysis and reference to diverse archival resources.
The three jurors who awarded the $3,000 prize were Julia Bryan-Wilson, associate professor of modern and contemporary art at the University of California, Berkeley; Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw, associate professor of American art and undergraduate chair of the department of the history of art at the University of Pennsylvania; and Kevin Murphy, Eugénie Prendergast Curator of American Art at the Williams College Museum of Art.

Of the book, the jurors wrote, “Lyford tells an entirely new story about how art travels, and how it might be marked as simultaneously ‘foreign’ and also ‘American.’ Her careful account of Noguchi’s projects in these decades foregrounds the artist’s persistent concerns about labor and contributes meaningfully to debates about the role of the artist within a wider economic landscape. Beautifully written and with urgently articulated stakes with regards to racism and citizenship, Lyford’s book draws from and contributes to an interdisciplinary set of concerns within Asian American studies, critical race theory, and art history. At heart it is also a book that grapples with modernism—its forms as well as its ideologies—to argue for a politics of abstraction. This pioneering book will change how we think about Noguchi, modernist sculpture, and American art.”

Lyford will give the annual Eldredge Prize lecture at the Smithsonian American Art Museum on January 27th, 2016. For more information about the prize, and to see a list of past winners, please visit: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/awards/eldredge/.A

“George Gorse in Genoa,” Monday, November 3, 4:15 pm, Lebus 110

genoa

Come hear Professor George Gorse talk about his recent research trip to Italy and the work he is doing on medieval Genoa on Monday, November 3, at 4:15 pm in Lebus 110.  While in Rome, Professor Gorse gave the keynote address on “”Pope Julius II della Rovere, Admiral Andrea Doria, Doge Andrea Gritti: Patrons of Renovatio Romae” at an international conference on “Family Patronage in Early Modern Genoa, Rome, and Venice (1500-1750),” sponsored by the Hertziana Library at the German Art Historical Institute in Rome on September 8-9.  He also presented a talk on September 26 at the Istituto della Storia dell’Arte at the University of Genoa on “Genova e la Storia dell’Arte.”

Professor Pohl’s Art History 133 Seminar Visits LACMA and San Gabriel Mission

Most of the art history classes offered at Pomona College include at least one field trip in order to take advantage of the wealth of cultural resources  available in the greater Los Angeles area.  Students in Professor Frances Pohl’s seminar “Art, Conquest and Colonization” visited the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on October 12 in order to view the U.S. and Spanish colonial collections, along with the Asian collection, which contained examples of the kinds of objects that were transported from the Philippines to Europe and New England via Mexico.  They also visited the San Gabriel Mission, founded in 1771, and met with Pomona art history alumna Professor Cynthia Lewis (’95), who teaches art history at Rio Hondo College, and historian Dr. John Macias, a recent CGU graduate, who are currently working on an inventory and history of several works of art owned by the mission.

 

133 Lunch at LACMA

Having lunch from the food trucks across the street from LACMA.

 

Outside of San Gabriel Mission.

Outside of San Gabriel Mission.

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