Tag: art history Pomona College

Claremont Colleges Art History and Art Conservation Senior Thesis Presentations, Wednesday, May 8, 6-7:30 pm, Lebus Court 113

The Claremont Colleges Art History and Art Conservation seniors presented the results of their senior thesis research on Wednesday evening, May 8, to a packed Lebus 113 on Pomona’s campus.  The audience was treated to talks on topics ranging from images of Roman emperor Hadrian’s boy-lover Antinous to the use of menstrual blood in late 20th and early 21st century feminist art.  All present were impressed by the thoughtfulness and thoroughness of the students’ projects. 

Left to right (art history majors unless indicated otherwise): Katie Carter (Art Conservation) Andrea Galdamez (Art History and Spanish), Brittnay Ahn, Skye Olson (Art Conservation), Kathleen LaManna, Mariel Frechette (GWS and Art HIstory), Aliza Hoffman (Art History and Anthropology), Shardai Zaragoza (Art History and English), Jess Rosenthal (Art Conservation), Lauren Quilty (Art History and Italian), Emma Molloy

Left to right: Katie Carter (SC – Art Conservation), Andrea Galdamez (PZ – Art History and Spanish), Brittnay Ahn (PO – Art History), Skye Olson (SC – Art Conservation), Kathleen LaManna (SC – Art History), Mariel Frechette (SC – Art History and GWS), Aliza Hoffman (PZ – Art History and Anthropology), Shardai Zaragoza (PZ – Art History and English), Jess Rosenthal (SC – Art Conservation), Lauren Quilty (PZ – Art History and Italian), Emma Molloy (PZ – Art History)

 

CLAREMONT COLLEGES ART HISTORY AND ART CONSERVATION SENIOR THESIS PRESENTATIONS

Kathleen LaManna (SC–Art History), “Power and Nostalgia in Eras of Cultural Rebirth: The Timeless Allure of the Farnese Antinous.”  First Reader: Michelle Berenfeld (PZ); Second Reader: George Gorse (PO)

Lauren Quilty (PZ–Art History and Italian), “Una suora colta e la Camera di San Paolo di Correggio (An Educated Nun and Correggio’s Camera di San Paolo).” First Reader: George Gorse (PO); Second Reader: Sarah Adler (Italian, SC)

Mariél Frechette (SC–Art History and GWS), “Danger in Deviance: Colonial Imagery and the Power of Indigenous Female Sexuality in New Spain.” GWS Reader: Chris Guzaitis (SC); ARHI Reader: Frances Pohl (PO)

Shardai Zaragoza (PZ–Art History and English), “Stain.  Images of Menstruation in Feminist Works.” First Reader: Frances Pohl (PO); Second Reader: Nancy Macko (Studio Art, SC)

Brittnay Ahn (PO–Art History), “Mastectomies in Art From the Late Nineteenth Century to the Twenty-First Century: Science, Silence, and Reclamation.” First Reader: Frances Pohl (PO); Second Reader: Kathleen Howe (PO)

Andrea Galdamez (PZ–Art History and Spanish), “The Legacy of Cannibalism: An Exploration of the Antropófago Manifesto.” First Reader: Dan Hackbarth (SC); Second Reader: Bill Anthes (PZ)

Emma Molloy (PZ–Art History), “’We would wipe away the old world’”: An examination of the Situationist International’s Use of Language and Image.”  First Reader: George Gorse (PO); Second Reader: Dan Hackbarth (SC)

Aliza Hoffman (PZ–Art History and Anthropology), “Practice vs Style: Contemporary Graffiti Commodification.” First Reader: Bill Anthes (PZ); Second Reader: Frances Pohl (PO)

Katie Carter (SC–Art Conservation), “Uncovering Faces: the Removal of Discolored Varnish from Tudor Portraits.” First Reader: Mary MacNaughton (SC); Second Readers: Burke Williams(Chemistry, CMC), George Gorse (PO)

Skye Olson (SC–Art Conservation), “Shelf Life: The Implications of Experimental Artist Materials in the Early Work of Janine Antoni.” First Reader: Mary MacNaughton (SC); Second Reader: Dan Hackbarth (SC)

Jess Rosenthal (SC–Art Conservation), “The “Twice-Looted” Archives: Giving Voice to the Long Silenced Witnesses to World War II.” First Reader: Bruce Coats (SC); Second Reader: Judy H. Sahak (Denison Library)

Frances Pohl Publishes New Edition of Her Textbook, “Framing America: A Social History of American Art”

In the third edition of Framing America: A Social History of American Art (Thames and Hudson, 2012), Professor Frances Pohl continues to expand her coverage of the history of American art.  Committed to an inclusive approach, this book contains the works of both canonical and previously marginalized artists, situating all within the historical moments in which they were produced.  This fully revised edition introduces 13 new images, from native peoples’ early encounters with Europeans to the 21st-century interest in sustainable architecture.  It also includes a full-page map of North America (reinforcing the continental approach contained in the book) and a comprehensive glossary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alumni Update: New Book by Art History alum Scott B. Montgomery (’85)

Scott B. Montgomery (’85) just celebrated the publication of his second book, co-authored with Alice A. Bauer, Casting Our Own Shadows: Recreating the Medieval Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela (University Press of the South, 2012).

2012 Summer Internship in American Art at the New York Historical Society

The New-York Historical Society is offering full-time summer curatorial internships in American art. The internships will take place from June 11 through August 3 and interns will be awarded a $2,000 stipend. Applications are invited for two different internships:

American Colonial Portraits

The American art intern will work with the curator of American art. The intern’s main duties will involve researching colonial portraits and miniatures in the collection, investigating attribution questions, and assisting in logistical tasks toward developing an upcoming traveling show of colonial portraits. The internship will offer the opportunity to develop connoisseurship, investigate archival and secondary resources in the New York area, and learn about the early stages of exhibition development. The intern will also assist with ongoing projects and other collection research as needed. A graduate student with strong research skills and a background in American art is preferred.

1913 Armory Show

The New-York Historical Society is organizing The Armory Show at 100: The New Art Spirit, a large-scale exhibition celebrating the centenary of the legendary 1913 Armory Show. The exhibition will take place from October 2013 through February 2014. The intern working on this project will report to the co-curators of the exhibition and will work on numerous tasks such as: assisting in researching and writing descriptions for the exhibition website (for example, researching key works that will appear on the website); researching prints and photographs to be included in the exhibition; providing support in acquiring images of key works, and other general exhibition support. The internship will offer the opportunity to develop research and writing skills and participate in preparations for a major loan exhibition. A graduate student with strong research skills and a background in American art is preferred.

Applications are due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, March 16. To apply:
Email a cover letter indicating the position you are applying for, a resume, a five to ten page writing sample from a research paper or a piece related to the position, and two letters of recommendation. 

 Application materials should be emailed with “2012 Summer Internship Application: Applicant’s Name” in the subject line to kimberly.orcutt@nyhistory.org and marilyn.kushner@nyhistory.org and copied to interns@nyhistory.org. Letters of recommendation should be emailed separately by recommenders with “Recommendation for: Applicant’s Name” in the subject line. No phone inquiries, please.

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