Tag: Pomona College (Page 2 of 2)

Sam Starr (’10) included in UC Riverside Exhibition “Re:Cycle–Bike Culture in Southern California”

 

Pomona College studio art major Sam Starr’s (’10) senior project,  “Circulus”, has been included in the exhibition “Re:Cycle – Bike Culture in Southern California” at the Sweeney Art Gallery, University of California, Riverside, from 7 October through 31 December, 2010.  See  http://www.sweeney.ucr.edu/exhibitions/recycle for more information.

Lisa Auerbach Receives Tiffany Award

 

Photography professor Lisa Auerbach was recently awarded the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award, a prize given biennially in recognition of the outstanding achievements of individual artists.  Candidates for this award are nominated by a national committee.  Artwork by Professor Auerbach is also featured in “Re:Cycle – Bike Culture in Southern California” at the Sweeney Art Gallery, University of California, Riverside, from 7 October through 31 December; and in “Art and Social Justice” at Union Theological Seminary, New York City, from 14 October through 10 December.

Art History Professor and Studio Art Senior Appear in the Los Angeles Times

In the May 26, 2010 edition of the Los Angeles Times (p. AA3), Professor Phyllis Jackson appeared in a photograph greeting Mai Huggins, the daugther of slain Black Panther member John Huggins.  The photograph accompanied an article by Larry Gordon on the installation of a plaque honoring the elder Huggins and Alprentice “Bunchy” Carter at UCLA.  Huggins and Carter were shot to death in UCLA’s Campbell Hall on January 17, 1969.  Both were honored as social justice advocates at the UCLA ceremony.

Sam Starr (’10) was pictured on the front page of the LATExtra section of the May 17, 2010 edition of the Los Angeles Times riding his bike in the wooden velodrome he constructed in the old Seaver Science Library as part of his senior art project, “Circulus 2010.”  Larry Gordon discusses Starr’s work as part of a broader look at senior projects at Pomona College in an article entitled “A Synthesis for Seniors: Undergrads meld studies into practical final projects.”

Winners of Rembrandt Junior Art Prize

This year the Rembrandt Club has provided the Department of Art and Art History with two Rembrandt  Junior Art Prizes of $2,000 each for summer projects for department junior majors.  This year’s winners are Paulette Barros (art history) and Seana McNamara (studio art).  Paulette will be pursuing research on her senior thesis project in Rome, Italy on images of Africans in Italian Baroque art, while Seana will by studying works of art in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, in particular the painting “The Garden of Earthly Delights” by Hieronymous Bosch, in preparation for her senior art project on the theme of “thought and memory.”

Sculpture I Exhibition Reception April 8, 2010

The Sculputre program of the Department of Art and Art History invites you to a reception celebrating Sculpture I carvings on April 8, in the Smith Campus Center Gallery, from 5 to 8 pm.

 

 

Pomona College Art Historians Hit the Air Waves

Art history Professor Frances Pohl and art history major Carrie Dedon were both interviewed on local Los Angeles radio stations over the past few weeks.  Carrie  Dedon appeared on “All Things Considered” on KPCC (89.3FM) and spoke with moderator Alex Cohen about her exhibition of Andy Warhol’s photographs at the Pomona College Museum of Art, “Famous for 15.”  On March 29, Frances Pohl appeared on Hugh Hewitt’s KRLA (870AM) talk show and spoke about the exhibition “American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765-1915” currently on view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

‘Caelum Moor’ by Norm Hines Reinstalled in Arlington, Texas October 2009

 

Caelum Moor, Tolmen Barrow

Last October ‘Caelum Moor,” by Pomona College emeritus professor of sculpture Norm Hines, was reinstalled in Arlington, Texas. The five freestanding granite sculptures, weighing a total of 540 tons, are located along Johnson Creek in Arlington’s Entertainment District, home to the Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Six Flags Over Texas, Hurricane Harbor, U.S. Bowling Congress, Arlington Convention Center and Cowboys Stadium.

In 1984 Hines was commissioned by Jane Mathes Kelton, CEO of the Kelton Mathes Development Corporation, to create Caelum Moor. The commission, which also includes the design of the park in which the sculpture was located, took two years to complete and cost $1.5 million to construct. Each of the five individual groups of stones has its own Celtic name.

From 1986 to 1997, Caelum Moor was located at the headwaters of Johnson Creek along Interstate 20 in south Arlington. In 1997, the land was acquired by a developer, and the stones were donated to the City of Arlington, where they remained in storage until their reinstallation last October.  For more information see 

Norm Hines was a professor of art at Pomona College in Claremont, Calif., in 1984 when he was commissioned by Jane Mathes Kelton to create the environmental work of art that came to be known as Caelum Moor. Kelton was a resident of Arlington and the CEO of the Kelton Mathes Development Corporation.

The Caelum Moor commission took two years to complete and cost $1.5 million to construct. The completed work of art, which included a park that Hines also designed, was later appraised at more than $3 million. The sculpture is comprised of five individual groups of stones, each with its own Celtic name within a landscaped setting.

The stone monuments range in height from 8 to 30 feet, weigh a total of more than 540 tons and have no celestial connection.

From 1986 to 1997, Caelum Moor was located at the headwaters of Johnson Creek along Interstate 20 in south Arlington. In 1997, the land was acquired by a developer, and the stones were donated to the City of Arlington, where they remained in storage until last October.  For more information see http://www.ci.arlington.tx.us/publicart/caelummoor.html

Jessica Drenk at Alumni Weekend, May 1-3, 2009

Jessica Drenk ’02
Artist
Jessica Drenk’s art has been influenced by her early appreciation of history and the natural world and by museums featuring archaeology and paleontology. Much of her work is focused on sculpting “museums of the present. Drenk earned her M.F.A. at the University of Arizona, where she was awarded the International Sculpture Center’s Outstanding Student Achievement Award in 2006. Her work has been featured in Sculpture Magazine and seen in museums across the country, as well as in Belgrade, Serbia and Marseilles, France. Selections from her award winning series, Reading Our Remains, will be exhibited during Alumni Weekend at Pomona College in the Smith Campus Center Gallery. This commissioned public art installation of altered book sculptures was originally created for the University of Arizona Library.

Newer posts »

© 2021 Art History

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑